Infographic: Essential micro-influencer marketing stats for 2019

Social media personalities with smaller audience sizes can revolutionize your marketing efforts. Consider these insights.

Does size really matter when it comes influencer marketing?

Many organizations can’t afford the price tag associated with major social media stars or celebrities and their millions of followers—but they don’t have to aim so high to achieve success.

Micro-influencers—social media personalities with audiences of 1,000–10,000—don’t have millions of followers, but they offer valuable and often more authentic marketing opportunities. They have higher engagement rates with their audiences and viewers trust their opinions when it comes to an organization or product.

SocialPubli compiled data from its “2018 Global Micro-Influencer Study” into an infographic with statistics brand managers should be aware of in 2019.

Insights include:

  • Seventy-seven percent of micro-influencers create content every day, and 48 percent post more frequently.
  • Eighty-four percent of micro-influencers recommend products or services at least once every week, with 99 percent saying they believe in what they promote.
  • They have seven times the engagement rate on Instagram as influencers with larger audiences.

For more reasons why you should be considering social media influencers with smaller viewer numbers for your marketing campaigns, consult the full infographic.

COMMENT

3 Responses to “Infographic: Essential micro-influencer marketing stats for 2019”

    Christopher Ryan says:

    Total BS research.

    The research is skewed and cherry picked.

    To imply that all micro influencers have a 7x more engagement rate doesn’t match the raw data. It is also making a very false assumption- that you choose influencers randomly. You don’t (unless you are incompetent). I could choose a pool of regular and mega influencers and come up with a conclusion that these influencers have 3x better engagement rate as well.

    Micro influencers won’t be posting every day when they can’t afford rent or car payments because PR companies refuse to pay them, and just want to gift product in exchange for an inauthentic advertisement on their best platform. It’s all fake. It’s all inauthentic. And, it doesn’t do jack for the brand or client.

      Ted Kitterman says:

      I think your point misses that not every organization is speaking to as broad an audience as a mega-influencer. Yet, some organizations are targeting these huge personalities. Smaller influencers are shown again and again to have more active and engaged followings than big names. Now, this isn’t to account for “influencers” who are trying to build a presence or have fake followers–as indicated by your reference to “affording car payments.” This does however apply to industry insiders and other personalities with small followings that fall short of a celebrity or superstar.

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