5 steps to reignite your productivity

When your train of thought runs off the rails, use these tactics to get back on track.

Don’t allow yourself to be overcome or thwarted by frustrations, distractions or procrastination.

Instead, try these tips to slip into a better, more productive and sustainable groove:

1. Schedule habits into your life.

“Our habits form our character and drive our lives,” notes Francisco Sáez, founder and CEO of FacileThings. “They consistently—and often unconsciously—are reflected in our daily behavior and our response to any situation. Ultimately, our habits are what define how efficient or inefficient we are.”

When it comes to personal productivity, it’s wise to bolster healthy habits, such as:

  • Surrounding yourself with the right tools and people.
  • Establishing a morning and evening routine.
  • Not always grinding it out.
  • Decluttering your workspace.
  • Trimming down your to-do-list.
  • Single-tasking.
  • Being physically active.
  • Consistently leveling up your skills.
  • Reflecting and learning from mistakes.
  • Learning how to delegate and outsource.

To make these sorts of habits stick, you must first schedule them into your life. According to James Clear, there are two ways to achieve this.

Put in your calendar. “Want to get back on track with your writing schedule?” he asks. “9 a.m. on Monday. Butt in chair. Hands-on keyboard. That’s when this is happening.” “Want to bounce back with your exercise habit? Give yourself a time and place that it needs to happen,” Clear adds. “6 p.m. every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. I’ll see you in the gym.”

Tie it to your current behavior. “Not all of your habits will fit a specific timeframe, but they all should have a trigger that acts as a reminder to do them,” Clear states.

“Want to floss? Every day after brushing your teeth. Same order, the same way, every time.” “Want to be happier?” asks Clear. “Every time you stop at a red light, tell yourself one thing you’re grateful for. The red light is the reminder. Same trigger, same sequence, every time.”

“The bottom line is this: it might be nice to tell yourself that you’re going to change, but getting specific makes it real and gives you a reason and a reminder to get back on track whenever you slip up,” Clear states.

“Soon is not a time, and some is not a number,” he writes. “When and where, exactly, are you going to do this? You might forget once, but what system do you have in place to automatically remind you the next time?”

2. Conduct a self-audit.

“People tend to develop behavior patterns that they repeat, often without realizing it,” says Lyn Christian, founder of SoulSalt Inc. “By noticing your own bad habits, you may recognize how to pull yourself out of a rut and get back on track.”

How can you go about this? Christian recommends asking yourself the following questions:

  • When has this happened before?
  • How is this time similar to other times?
  • Is this indeed a pattern, or is it a singular incidence?
  • How many times a year does this pattern play out?

It’s important to remember that “when you’ve gotten off track, it’s not always self-inflicted,” she adds. “You also have patterns in how you respond when life throws a wrench into your plans.”

“You can apply these same questions to audit your patterns of reacting to change and crisis,” adds Christian. “Are you proactive or reactive? Do you overreact and panic, or shut down and do nothing?”

Since most of us have difficulty being honest with ourselves, we should seek feedback from others. It could be your spouse, best friend, business partner or mentor. Just seek out someone who is bold enough to provide unvarnished truth.

“Ask them to share their impressions,” advises Christian. “If you sense the cause of things going awry is a bigger deal than just a coincidence, find a professional, such as a coach or therapist. They “can assist you in breaking harmful patterns.”

The main takeaway? If you want to turn things around, don’t just do it by yourself. “After all, if you could have turned things around on your own, you probably would have already.”

3. Don’t put yourself down; build yourself up.

It’s easy to beat yourself up — particularly when it comes to losses, mistakes or poor performance. This is also the case when we aren’t as productive as we would like to be. Why are we so hard on ourselves?

“We live in the age of perfectionism,” states elite performance expert Dr. Michelle Cleere. “One mistake, error, or loss is a knock to your ego and identity. You become ‘less than’ or so you think.”

“The problem? This creates a snowball effect “until you don’t really know who you are or why you are doing what you are doing,” adds Dr. Cleere. Even worse? If this becomes the norm, “you’re coming from a fixed mindset and will never be good enough or able to enjoy what you are doing.”

Instead of being unkind to yourself, use setbacks as learning experiences that can help you grow. Focus on what went right and what went wrong–without dwelling on negativity.

Additionally, find ways to rebuild your self-confidence by:

  • Reflecting on past accomplishments.
  • Telling yourself every day that you are good enough and worthy of respect.
  • Learning something new and sharing it with others.
  • Surrounding yourself with a positive support system.
  • Enhancing your existing skillset.

Most importantly, start being kinder to yourself. “In research studies, people who have greater levels of self-compassion tend to be more motivated, less lazy and more successful over time,” notes Susan David. One way to cultivate self-compassion is by ending the tug-of-war inside yourself.

Part of this battle is not viewing emotions and experiences as either “good” or “bad.” It’s more about acceptance.

So, the next time you face “a challenging emotion like sadness or disappointment,” don’t berate yourself. Instead, say, “I’m feeling sad.” And, follow that up by asking, “What is this sadness a signpost of? What is it pointing to that’s important to me? What is it teaching me?” advises David.

4. Make simple changes to your workspace (or your schedule).

Your workspace has an outsize impact on your productivity. If you’re mired in clutter and chaos, you could be spiking your anxiety and stress levels.

The good news? Even if you’re on a limited budget or don’t have too much room to work with, there are ways to spruce up your workplace, by:

  • Purchasing ergonomic furniture.
  • Organizing and eliminating clutter.
  • Personalizing your workspace with art and photos.
  • Introducing live plans.
  • Choosing the right colors. (For example, blue can exude calmness and serenity.)
  • Embracing natural lighting, or listening to white noise.

Besides shaking up your workspace, you might want to try tweaking your schedule. In a perfect world, your schedule would be based on when you’re most productive. So, if you’re a night owl, it doesn’t make sense to force yourself to wake up at 5 a.m. Work with your manager to set a schedule that matches your most productive hours of the day (or evening).

5. Strip away complexity.

Have you ever tried to lose weight, only to quickly get derailed? It happens to most of us, as the end goal is just too difficult to achieve.

The thing is, trying too much too quickly is unrealistic and overwhelming — which means you’re just setting yourself up for failure.

The same is true when it comes to your productivity. Rather than overdoing it with tools or massive objectives, go back to the bite-size basics, and work yourself up from there. Getting back on track might be something as simple as prioritizing your time, turning off your phone or accomplishing one small task.

John Rampton is the founder Calendar and Due. Read more of his work on the Calendar blog

COMMENT

One Response to “5 steps to reignite your productivity”

    Dawn Donohue says:

    Thank you for the article. I was able to take away a few valuable suggestions. Besides dealing with the aftermath of Covid and losing some of my biggest clients….my mother fell ill and I started taking care of both my parents. My mother recently passed and my dad has required a great deal of my attention. I’ve been struggling to find my way …especially professionally. I’m a graphic designer/marketing person and finding my creative spirit again has been difficult. I’m struggling emotionally, mentally and creatively and reading your article was helpful. I do need to add structure, routines and scheduling to my days. I’m looking for the light at the end of this tunnel. Thank you again!

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